Innovation in China – opportunity for companies says Petrowski.

Computerworld Norway reports on a speech given by Jack Perkowski, the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of ASIMCO Technologies at an American Chamber of Commerce lunch in Singapore, where he posits that innovation will be the next “big surprise out of China”.

He argues that there is pressure in China to find more affordable products than those offered by the west, which will inevitably lead to innovation. This will be something that companies need to be aware of, he is quoted as saying.

“Even if you never go to China and your company’s never going to have an operation in China, unless you have a product that is completely insulated from China, then you’d better be aware of this [drive] because this will be the cause of a lot of future global competition.”

Perkowski said that although China was now the most competitive country in the world, with every multinational operating there, it was still ‘the best country in the world to start up and build a business’.

Perkowski argues that there will be opportunities for companies in China and is quoted as saying that he believes China will be an early adopter of new technologies.

“Technologies that have some very interesting characteristics, that may not get traction in US or Europe or elsewhere, they will have a ready market in China. The one thing about China is, if you’ve got a product that works, it gets into production fast, you don’t have to wait around two years for a lot of testing.”

You can read the rest of this interesting post at this link.

PHOTO OF THE DAY: This spectacular photograph shows the edge of the Erebus Glacier tongue on the McMurdo Sound sea ice.

Erebus Glacier Tongue

Photograph by: Andre Fleuette, National Science Foundation. Date Taken: November 9, 2005

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~ by abstraktbiblos on Monday, 5 May, 2008.

2 Responses to “Innovation in China – opportunity for companies says Petrowski.”

  1. Great photo – does the photographer have any more?

  2. These photographs come from the U.S. Antarctic Program’s Antarctic Photo Library. They are made available thanks to the National Science Foundation. You can check for any other photos by Andre Fluette at the USAP website.

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